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Mediate Don’t Litigate: Part One -The High Cost of Going to Court

Posted on Aug 15 2012 under Court Mediation, Previous Programs

Have you ever heard someone threaten “I’ll see you in court!”? If this has happened to you, or if you have ever thought of suing someone, join us on October 2nd as Stephen Kotev interviews attorney and mediator Daniel Preston Dozier to find out how much litigation really costs, and the hidden pitfalls of actually taking someone to court.


Daniel P. Dozier, a member of the law firm of Press, Potter & Dozier, LLC, received his J. D. in 1971 from Wayne State University. He is an internationally-recognized pioneer in conflict management and collaborative decision-making, with nearly 35 years of experience as an attorney, negotiator, and mediator, and 25 years as a mediator and facilitator of complex multi-party environmental and public policy, employment, contract and commercial disputes. He has been appointed by United States District Courts throughout the United States to mediate complex environmental cases and is listed on numerous rosters of neutrals. Dozier has been admitted to the practice of law in Michigan, the District of Columbia, and Maryland and is a member of the District of Columbia Bar and the Maryland State Bar Association. He was an adjunct professor at the Vermont Law School where he taught Environmental Dispute Resolution from 1989 to 2000.

Mr. Dozier has written numerous articles and monographs on alternative dispute resolution, including Stakeholder Collaborative Processes for Consensus Building on Planning Issues with James L. Ariail III, AICP and Allyn Finegold in the on line journal of the American Planning Association, Practicing Planner, Finding the Common Good: the Sugarbush Water Withdrawal Case with John H. Fitzhugh, 1996 and a chapter in Mediation Ethics: Cases and Commentaries Edited by Ellen Waldman, Jossey-Bass, 2011

For Information see:  Daniel P. Dozier and Stephen Kotev

 


2 Replies to “Mediate Don’t Litigate: Part One -The High Cost of Going to Court”

  1. I believe it is the responsibility of lawyers and mediators to educate the community about the value of mediation rather than litigation.

    It is true that the communities understanding and knowledge of the mediation process could be better, therefore, it is my intention to invite industry groups and the general public to seminars/information sessions to further promote the features and cost benefits of mediation over litigation.

  2. Thank you Roger for posting. I absolutely agree it is a duty and responsibility to the public to educate them about the value of mediation. The best of luck to you in giving back to your community and educating them. Thank you for listening to the show.

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